What You Need To Know About Ferrofluid?

Published: 16th August 2010
Views: N/A

Have you heard of ferrofluid? It's not a substance that comes up in daily conversation, unless you're a scientists for experimenter. This substance is a liquid that contains iron particles. It has some unique properties that have allowed a variety of products to be created. To discover how this iron particle fluid is used in many techie products, scan this article.



Ferrofluid is a liquid substance of pitch black color made from very small iron particles that can become magnetized when placed into a magnetic field. It was developed in the United States for its space program. The size of these iron particles is ten nanometers in diameter or the size of a single molecule.



It is considered superparamagnetic, SPM, and thus, creates liquid seals which are held in position by magnetic fields. You can see it used in magnetic disk drives of your drive shaft to keep off the dust.



The loudspeakers also contain this SPM; it keeps the inner parts cool. If you could take a peek inside your computer hard drives, you would see their presence. It also keeps the dusts and other contaminants off.



For many years, the superparamagnetic has been in used in material recycling; it is very useful in the material separation processes in mining industries. The secret is the fluid's apparent density, which can be increased by applying a magnetic field, thus, creates the ability to separate objects of varying density by means of sinking or floating.



There have been experiments to use the magnetic fluid in manufacturing electrical transformers, specifically, liquid-filled transformers. This pitch black fluid can provide thermal and dielectric advantages to transformers. It can be employed to enhance the cooling process by improving fluid circulation within the transformer windings.



In solenoids, the black fluid can minimize the noise intensity in some equipment including the Home Care Kidney Dialysis machines. It also makes the solenoid-based equipment more reliable, cost effective due to noise suppression insulation, and simpler design.



Even the Sensors and Switches benefit from this SPM fluid with its unique properties. It can improve the motion sensitivity in many sensing applications such as inclinometers, flow meters, accelerometers, tilt, vibration, pressure and level sensors and other switches.



The Medical Science also uses the properties of ferrofluid, in which, it is used as contrast agents for MRI and for Cancer detection. For this application, the fluid contains the iron oxide nanoparticles called the SPION or Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles.



Currently, there are experiments using the SPM fluid in cancer treatment named as 'magnetic hyperthermia. Hyperthermia is based on the fact that a ferrofluid in the presence of alternating magnetic field will release heat.



As mentioned in the onset, the magnet particles were created for the US space program. NASA has experimented with these nanoparticles in a closed loop as the basis for a spaceship's attitude control system. To change the angular momentum, and thereby influence the rotation of the spaceship, a magnetic field is applied into a loop filled with these nanos.



Also, the US Air Force introduced the RAM or Radar-Absorbent Material. It is a paint manufactured from ferrofluidic and non-magnetic substances. To reduce the radar cross-section of the aircraft, the US Air Force reduced the reflection of electromagnetic waves.



There are other areas which also use the properties of ferrofluid to come up with a product that would ultimately benefit mankind.



Want to do some experimenting with ferrofluid. You can get this liquid at http://www.magnet4sale.com/ . We have the fluid you need to start your own testing and investigating of this liquid when it is under a magnetic field. If you want to learn more about this fluid go to Ferrofluid. You can also get a neodymium magnet to complete your kit and to start experimenting.

Report this article Ask About This Article


Loading...
More to Explore